Job Announcement: Curator

The Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals, an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, seeks a curator to manage, maintain, and promote the museum’s collection of rocks, minerals, fossils, gems, and meteorites. The curator must have the technical and managerial skills and expertise required to maintain, display, and enhance the Museum’s extensive collections and associated records. The position requires a dynamic person with a proven ability to translate the mineral collection into accessible and compelling exhibits and teaching tools or programs.

Competencies & Experience Requirements:

  • Minimum of a Bachelor’s degree in geology, Master’s or PhD preferred.
  • 20180820_144128At least 2 years technical experience in mineral sciences involving education, curation and/or collection management with a detailed knowledge of mineral collection management.
  • Proficiency in basic personal computer applications.
  • Basic knowledge of scientific mineralogical equipment.
  • Proficiency in the use of both verbal and written English language.
  • An ability to convey excitement about the value of earth sciences to scholars and novices alike. The curator must be as comfortable with people as with minerals and be capable of introducing one to the other.

Full job description and details are available at https://ricenorthwestmuseum.org/contact/job-seekers/

TO APPLY: Please email your resume and cover letter to careers@ricenorthwestmuseum.org  or mail job materials to Julian C. Gray, Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals, 26385 NW Groveland Drive, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124. Application materials must be received by October 8, 2018. No phone calls, please.

Survival and Resilience after a Cascadia Earthquake Event

Block diagram of Cascadia Subduction Zone

Block diagram of the Cascadia Subduction Zone, where two tectonic plates are locked together and building up for The Big One. Image from the USGS.

This week’s New Yorker article on The Really Big One has struck a chord with my friends on my Facebook feed. I’ve seen several posts this morning from geologists and non-geologists alike expressing fear and hopelessness in the face of a looming threat: the next great Cascadia earthquake, which may happen at any moment and will bring the coastal Pacific Northwest along with both Portland and Seattle to its knees.

Though the article’s science and history are spot-on, the author has left out a critical part of the story: just what are we supposed to do about it? Contrary to popular belief, a Cascadia earthquake does not mean that everything is simply “toast,” as FEMA’s Kenneth Murphy is quoted as saying. Each of us has the power, both as individuals and as a regional community, to prepare for survival and resilience.

Keep reading to learn more about what you can do! Continue reading