Bring the museum to your classroom free on January 12

Hey teachers–would you like your students to experience the Rice Museum for free from the comfort of your own classroom?

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On Thursday, January 12, we will be participating in an interactive livestream event through FieldTripZoom. Curator Leslie Moclock will take your students on a tour of our phenomenal collection of petrified wood. You’ll learn all about how wood fossils form and what they can tell us about Earth’s history, from ancient life to modern mountain building.

This presentation addresses topics including ancient life, fossilization, regional geography, climate, and volcanoes. It’s geared for earth science students in grades 4-6 but those who are a little younger or a little older can appreciate it as well.

Join us next Thursday to delve deeper into Earth Science!

What: Phenomenal Petrified Wood (Grades 4-6)

Where: Your classroom, tuning into the Rice Museum via Field Trip Zoom

When: Thursday, Jan 12. Live sessions at 8:10 AM, 9:10 AM, and 12:10 PM (Pacific time)

How: If your district, classroom, or homeschool group is not subscribed to FieldTripZoom, you can access this program via a free trial. Simply send an email to freetrial@fieldtripzoom.com and request the Rice Museum’s program for January 12. (After following the link, you will have to scroll down to find our museum’s program details.)

If you are already subscribed, just log in to your account and select our program from the Zone Calendar.

FieldTripZoom partners with museums and other educational institutions all over the US to facilitate unique live and interactive educational experiences between educational content providers and K-12 educators, students and homeschoolers. We are pleased to host this opportunity on their platform.

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July 10: Photomicrography Techniques at Geological Society of Oregon Country Meeting

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Julian Gray will be presenting “Digital Specimen Photography for Geologists,” a presentation on macrophotography and photomicrography, the photographing of things at the microscope level. The event will be at the Portland State University as part of the Geological Society of Oregon Country events.

Vesunvianite 1 Ed Scale - crystal under microscope.Geologists constantly need to depict rocks, minerals, and fossils for presentations and publications. Digital photography has extended the range of possibilities in illustrating samples. One common problem, reduced depth of field at high magnifications, is easily overcome using stacking techniques. This technique uses sharply focused portions of sequential photographs focused on different slices or stacks to produce a synthesized images in which the subject is crisply focused.

Julian Gray, executive director of the Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals, is a geologist and semi-professional photographer specializing in photomicrography. He has experimented extensively with photographing through microscopes and using stacking techniques and others to produce stunning images with extensive depth of field, bringing sand, crystals, minerals, and even salt to life and shine like diamonds. Julian’s images have been published in mineral magazines and books. He is also the co-author and contributing photographer of the upcoming book, Minerals of Georgia.

For more information and directions, see their site for details.